Helping Out/WPC

Satisfaction

Meet Evette, again. She’s my niece and there’s no doubt she’s “Sew in Love”. I’m getting pure satisfaction from seeing her use her beginning sewing skills towards gift-giving while her new husband is off at basic training. We are very proud of them both. Proud for his service to our country and to her holdin’ down the homefront while he’s away.

Last week she came to me with a preplanned embroidery project. Unfortunately, while making the project, her friend’s sewing machine bit the dust. So I was getting to do a little more than planned. Not a problem. Glad to help.

Fast forward to the embroidery…….

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She showed me what she needed and chose a beautiful font. I had it digitized and ready to go. The A was well on it’s way in this picture. With this design, there would be some re-hooping of the item in order to fit the project. (My hoop is pretty much ancient compared to newer ones. Mine’s circa 18 to 20 years old.) Unfortunately, the A was all that got completed before my memory card fried. Unable to fix it, we improvised, overcame and adapted. Marines out there will appreciate that last sentence. Semper Fi!

Moving on, I must let my niece know that her “Large” pins were a hit with me. I’ve always used the normal size, but after using hers, I may have to get some of these. They were so generous in size and I didn’t prick my fingers nearly as much. Who says you don’t learn from the younger generation??!! And that Minky fabric is soft! And slick to sew with. I tried the walking foot but reverted to the normal foot after about 10 inches. Any hints out there would be appreciated for future minky projects.

 

Above are the completed carrier cover and the baby quilt.

And just for the baby’s sake, I’ve a little message I’m sure Evette would want to pass along…..

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In-Doors/ Thursday Doors

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These doors are serving as a frame for my weekly entry into the Thursday Doors realm. I could have edited a little more but decided to stick with a realistic lighting.

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This museum is the Missouri History Museum and this is the front view of the statue. Thomas Jefferson was such a remarkable president. They just don’t make ’em like that anymore. Personal note: I was so excited to tour his Monticello home back when my daughters were small that I shut my finger in the car door. It was quite a memory-maker moment to say the least. (I need to see if my old snapshots offer door possibilities).

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Thought you’d like to see what the little green box says.

Thursday Doors finds its beginnings over at Norm 2.0. Please visit and find more door posts there by clicking the blue frog at the bottom of his post. You won’t be disappointed.

 

Rolling in the Deep/WPC

Unusual

Unusual

I stepped out the back door and caught this eye-catching shot of clouds at sunset last week. It looked like the clouds were rolling out of a cavity.

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And for some unusual reason, rotating the picture gives them an even more dramatic rolling appearance.

For more weekly photo challenge entries, click here.

Rural Chariton County/Thursday Doors

Thursday Doors

This week for my Thursday Doors post, I have a piece of yesteryear in CharitonCounty Missouri to share.

Tucked at the junction of Highways 5 and WW, there stands this abandoned building that I believe was once a school house. But I can’t quite be sure. There is not a signpost or placard visible and I didn’t want to trespass. Not that I’m afraid of being confronted….

more that I’m not a huge fan of ticks.

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The schoolhouse theory could be wrong as I’m not sure there’d be attic windows like these used during this era. So for me, it’s a mystery.

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I’d like to state that I think this would make a pretty fine farmhouse too just for the record. And yes, that is a tv antenna on the roof.

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I love old maps!

Historically, Chariton County was originally part of Howard County (outlined in bold above). In 1816, its current name and boundaries were given.Icouldn’t find any information on the building above, but I found a little excerpt from a Dept. of Natural Resources document describing the desirability of the area during this time frame.

In one 1819 account from Old Chariton David Manchester wrote to his sister in New York about the new land and how several young bachelors had fared during the 1818-19 winter. Manchester related the federal government land price of $1.50 per acre, but he said that most nearby land sold from $2-6, and the majority aroundChariton was $4 and up. complained of Looking into the future young Manchester the damned contracted New England men are our greatest opponents. They are jealous of us and envy us because they think that we will be admitted into the union on equal footing with the other states and become a large and powerful state. Poor insignificant Devils, who care for you? We will have our right in spite of you. But now [they] want to make slaves of us, no the people of Louisiana never will submit. • The boys are employed in building some houses in Chariton for themselves. . Our employment last winter was carrying on the distillery business. (David Manchester letter, 19 April 1819 #2064 Joint Collection, UMC) This one anecdote accurately described the relatively high value of Chariton district land and the desire of immigrants to make a new home in the Far West.

I wonder if Manchester was also on the search for a beau for his sister??  And a future lil’ homestead in Missouri?

For other Thursday Doors entries, I hope you’ll check the Blue Frog link at the bottom of Norm’s blog.

 

A Gem on Route 66 /ThursdayDoors

Thursday Doors

When at the Missouri History Museum we were tempted with the display of an ice cream shop on Route 66 that is still open after 80 years. Introducing Ted Drewes.

But first, probably the only door I could find worth a hoot for this post…….

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A reminder of something that has disappeared within the last 80 years. Related are: Where will Superman do his quick change, How to make collect calls, Answering a random phone booth ringing and Using actual money to make a phone call, all a part of history.

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Back to Ted Drewe’s –a first view. Here’s a little hint. If you see nuns eating at an establishment, it’s gonna be O.K.

Who is Ted Drewe’s? Ted Drewes Sr., was a St. Louis attraction, winning the Muny Tennis Championships each year from 1925 to 1936. Feel free to read more here.

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A ‘door’ for posterity’s sake.

Boasting 12 serving windows, Ted Drewes motto is “Our Business is Service”.

The website tells that it is hardly recognizable during the Christmas season as they sell trees and the lot is loaded with them. They’ve been doing that for over 50 years. One thing you can say about this place is that they are certainly good at longevity and have obviously found their niche in St. Louis.

A line in the summer sun makes the treat even more delish.

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The daughters approve! Our ‘adoptee’ daughter was a great tour guide to go along with the GPS and we thank you Miss Meaghan for your outstanding hospitality! Til next time….

Other Doors posts seen here at Norm 2.0. Enjoy!

Can’t Stop Traffic/WPC

Bridge

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Couldn’t convince my husband to stop traffic for me in order to get a good pic of the Stan Musial Veterans Memorial Bridge. So I could only hope for a better view on the return trip.

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I think I got the better view.

For other weekly WordPress Photo Challenge entries, click here.

1957 Airstream/Thursday Doors

Sharing someo of the Missouri History Museum in St. Louis this Thursday Doors.

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Can’t say I’ve ever visited a museum with a motel sign out front.

 

The Missouri History museum is located in Forest Park, the grounds of The World’s Fair of 1904.  As we strolled through the Route 66 exhibit, we came upon this. It was pretty fabmazing!

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Inserting Doors here:

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And here, with a little peek inside. Wish they’d let you open that door but the alarms would have sounded. (I learned that from a curious little boy who wandered a little too far from his family.)

I tried getting a view through those slat-glass panes, but it was very hard to see. But there is a couch that I imagine folds down into a bed. Shelf above the couch for ‘stuff’.Airstream4 (2)

I wish I could have gotten a clear view of the receipt to let you know the cost of this 1964 road trip as well as the location of that Camp’otel.

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I was a child of the 60’s and I can tell you I’m glad I wasn’t subjected to this style of camping. Sleeping on top of the car had to have been pretty unrestful if you had young children. I guess what I’m suggesting here is that you probably didn’t take them along until you knew they wouldn’t fall out of bed/tent.

A clear window view.

Thanks for visiting and I hope you enjoyed this weeks Thursday Doors. Please visit the esteemed leader of our Door Band, Norm 2.0 for more great door entries. 

 

 

The Newlyweds/WPC

Delta

This week, share a photograph that signifies transitions and change to you. It can be the very beginning of a phase, or the very end. As you pick up your lens, explore the ways in which a single photograph can express time, while only showing us a small portion of any given moment.

I’m choosing a recent moment from this past weekend at my neice’s wedding. All eyes are upon you at that transitional moment in time where you become The Mr. and Mrs.

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All our love and blessings to you both!!

For other photo challenge entries, click here.

2 Senoritas & Herb/ Sunday Sampler

It’s time to show off my mother’s stash that I finally put on Etsy today. Sorry I took so long, Mom.

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She does such a wonderful job at hand embroidery. I could definitely see these in a South Texan ranch. hint hint (we have some family there btw)

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This  lil’ berry pattern has a special touch with some blue leaves. They would be lovely sittin’ next to a July 4th dish.

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We used to know a guy named Herb. He was my husband’s boss for a short time. But the ‘herb’ here is obviously not a person, just a lovely Marjoram pattern for someone’s kitchen. Sous Chef’s, take note!

Hope you enjoy your week and this episode of the Sunday Sampler.

Supply and Demand /Sunday Sampler

Sunday Sampler

Daughter #1 is moving off to grad school and she mentioned she didn’t have many pot holders. You have to understand, she’s as burn-your-fingers prone as I am. So this is an issue for consideration. And, being as I have a supply, I will fill this demand.

Momma Econ 101

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First is the scrappy, upcycled version with denim backing. Very durable and good for protecting those 10 digits.

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Next is a more decorative style and honestly makes a better trivet than pot holder.  Protecting your counter or table top is essential. Also, wool products are self-extinguishing so a good choice for those extra hot pans.

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This is a Hexi made of cotton yarn and would double as either a dishcloth or trivet.

For your educational enjoyment, let me say that cotton will not melt. It will burn, yes. But not melt. A good protective item to have between your dishes and the table.

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But of course the best fire prevention is this item.

I told you this was Momma Econ 101!!