Searching for Red/ Thursday Doors

Digging through the archives this week led me to some Red that will, once again, cover the Red prompt for today on Instagram and the Thursday Doors. Some unplanned time off led me down this road and I hope to be back on my photo-taking binges very soon.

To see other Thursday Doors entries, stop by Norm 2.0 and scroll down to the blue frog and click. You’ll see wonderful door posts from around the world.

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The red is pretty washed out here, but it’s hanging in there. No snow currently in Missouri at this time. But I do remember trick-or-treating in snow!

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Slightly more red and all doors seem to be present and accounted for.

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Devoid of doors as far as I can tell. But the red is definitely showing best in my 3rd choice.

A little blast from the past since we’re on the topic of farms from “The History of Pettis County, Missouri 1882”

The first crops were principally corn. Oats, wheat, hemp, flax and rye were raised. The tame grasses were not cultivated. The wild grass was considered good for all stock and hundreds of tons of prairie hay were annually mown by hand and stacked for the winter feed. At an early day spring and fall wheat were both tried. The smut and the accumulation of chintz bugs on spring wheat early convinced the farmers of this section that it was an unprofitable crop. Fall wheat, although not extensively raised, has generally done well. With the early farmers, corn was the staple product, and became the staff of life for man and beast, and the failure of the corn crop brought almost a famine. On corn, the hardy settlers depended for Johnny cake, hominy, hasty pudding, and succotash. Corn was the principal feed for horses, swine, cattle, and sheep. In the early autumn, just as soon as the ears had sufficiently ripened, the farmer with his wife and family entered the corn field, and stripped the blades from the ear down, after which they were cured, bound into bundles, and stacked as provender for winter use. The tops of the stalks were cut above the ear, bound into bundles and shocked for the cattle.

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Dr. Matthew Hall / Thursday Doors

Thursday Doors in the words of Norm 2.0 is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favorite door photos from around the world. Feel free to join in on the fun by creating your own Thursday Doors post each week and then sharing it, between Thursday morning and Saturday noon (North American eastern time)

Number 15 on the walking tour of Arrow Rock, Missouri is the Dr. Matthew Hall House. Dated 1846, it is nearing 172 years old.

Arrow Rock was established in 1829.

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Dr Matthew 1 (2).jpg  The description in the self-guided tour of Dr. Hall’s influence on this town’s history is stated as saying:

15 Dr. Mathew Hall House,1846|Dr. Hall was a noted civic leader and community physician. In 1856, he moved his family to the country to escape “the evil influence of a river town.”– MDNR       To see more of this guide, click here. 

It must have been a rough place to reside at some point. Hard to imagine now.                              

For me, this town represents much of a ‘frontier-era Missouri’. It sits along the path taken by Lewis and Clark on their famous Expedition.

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I’ve been posting on this town several Thursdays now and I think it’s time to let it go with a slide show of extras. If you happen to be driving down I-70 in central Missouri though, I highly recommend taking the exit to Arrow Rock to see this River Town time capsule. It’s not a tourist trap and comes with a very scenic drive along the way. A real gem!

 

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In-Doors/ Thursday Doors

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These doors are serving as a frame for my weekly entry into the Thursday Doors realm. I could have edited a little more but decided to stick with a realistic lighting.

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This museum is the Missouri History Museum and this is the front view of the statue. Thomas Jefferson was such a remarkable president. They just don’t make ’em like that anymore. Personal note: I was so excited to tour his Monticello home back when my daughters were small that I shut my finger in the car door. It was quite a memory-maker moment to say the least. (I need to see if my old snapshots offer door possibilities).

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Thought you’d like to see what the little green box says.

Thursday Doors finds its beginnings over at Norm 2.0. Please visit and find more door posts there by clicking the blue frog at the bottom of his post. You won’t be disappointed.