Linen Service/ Thursday Doors

Having worked in food service for a number of years, I recognized the business name we drove past in Mexico, Missouri. But what caught my attention before that was the building it occupied.

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Arent’ these doors (and windows) attractive in how they accent this old building?

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In a hometown business, front door appeal is the best first impression.

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This Century Business Award tells it plainly that they have endured 100 years of service.

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I stepped into the breezeway and was pleased to find a more informative plaque of their prestigious award.

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Crown Linen Services operates in a pretty significant swath of area in Missouri and Illinois. And in case you hadn’t realized by now, they now have bragging rights to over 125 years of service.

For other Thursday Door entries, please visit Norm 2.0 where you’ll be met with wonderful door posts from around the globe.Just find the blue frog button and click.

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Wooldridge and Overton Bottoms/ Thursday Doors

Wooldridge, Missouri was a victim of the Flood of ’93. Driving down into the Overton Bottoms Refuge area (which is adjacent to Wooldridge), it’s hard to get a feel for the volume of water that ran this town into near collapse. This Sign signifies an entrance.

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The map helps our minds grasp a picture of the area the refuge embodies.

There were still crops to harvest at the time we meandered down this gravel road.

Driving over the tracks, aka city limits.

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I didn’t find a lot of information about Wooldridge, Missouri other than the flooding of ’93 and the founder’s name. But I found several moments where I wished for someone to be standing outside that I could have asked a few questions. In the meantime, I leave you with the last photo here of some hidden doors that are behind that semi- trailer.

Sidenote: I found it tough to snap photos of the delapidated places we drove past here. I felt I was nearly intruding on these residents and the conditions some were actually living in. But hindsight has brought me the realization that I should have photographed it for various reasons. One huge reason is for a viewpoint of the lasting impact of natural disasters. Lesson learned. 

For other Thursday Doors entries, check out Norm 2.0 and find the blue frog button on the bottom of his latest Doors post.

 

 

A Stop at Wooldridge/ Thursday Doors

I’ve hoarded some pics of a lazy drive through a very small, quiet Mid-Missouri village one Saturday in September. Time to share.

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I love this house on the hill. That, my friend, is what you call a breakfast porch. Sipping your coffee, watching the sun come up is what I would do with a view like that. I can imagine it’s been here about as long as the town has existed. Wooldridge, Missouri, named after Dr. Wooldridge, was founded in 1901.

We drove down Highway 179 passing by a chance to see a rather large Steam Engine Show. We weren’t in the spirit to mingle with large crowds so this little piece of turf seemed to fit the bill.

All small towns have abandoned buildings and most have or have at one point had a post office. The post office has been in operation since 1902. However, you must know this isn’t the original without my telling you. I bet if I had stopped in here, I may have heard some good gossip 😉 Those mail persons know quite a bit about small town inhabitants. You’ll just have to trust me on this.

Even though I have the space for more, I’ll be saving the 2nd half of this doorscursion for (possibly) the next time.

 

Thursday Doors is a weekly blog challenge hosted by Norm 2.0 in which door lovers from around the world join in to show their door finds. To see Norm’s and others, scroll down on his page and click on the blue frog button.

Searching for Red/ Thursday Doors

Digging through the archives this week led me to some Red that will, once again, cover the Red prompt for today on Instagram and the Thursday Doors. Some unplanned time off led me down this road and I hope to be back on my photo-taking binges very soon.

To see other Thursday Doors entries, stop by Norm 2.0 and scroll down to the blue frog and click. You’ll see wonderful door posts from around the world.

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The red is pretty washed out here, but it’s hanging in there. No snow currently in Missouri at this time. But I do remember trick-or-treating in snow!

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Slightly more red and all doors seem to be present and accounted for.

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Devoid of doors as far as I can tell. But the red is definitely showing best in my 3rd choice.

A little blast from the past since we’re on the topic of farms from “The History of Pettis County, Missouri 1882”

The first crops were principally corn. Oats, wheat, hemp, flax and rye were raised. The tame grasses were not cultivated. The wild grass was considered good for all stock and hundreds of tons of prairie hay were annually mown by hand and stacked for the winter feed. At an early day spring and fall wheat were both tried. The smut and the accumulation of chintz bugs on spring wheat early convinced the farmers of this section that it was an unprofitable crop. Fall wheat, although not extensively raised, has generally done well. With the early farmers, corn was the staple product, and became the staff of life for man and beast, and the failure of the corn crop brought almost a famine. On corn, the hardy settlers depended for Johnny cake, hominy, hasty pudding, and succotash. Corn was the principal feed for horses, swine, cattle, and sheep. In the early autumn, just as soon as the ears had sufficiently ripened, the farmer with his wife and family entered the corn field, and stripped the blades from the ear down, after which they were cured, bound into bundles, and stacked as provender for winter use. The tops of the stalks were cut above the ear, bound into bundles and shocked for the cattle.

Dr. Matthew Hall / Thursday Doors

Thursday Doors in the words of Norm 2.0 is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favorite door photos from around the world. Feel free to join in on the fun by creating your own Thursday Doors post each week and then sharing it, between Thursday morning and Saturday noon (North American eastern time)

Number 15 on the walking tour of Arrow Rock, Missouri is the Dr. Matthew Hall House. Dated 1846, it is nearing 172 years old.

Arrow Rock was established in 1829.

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Dr Matthew 1 (2).jpg  The description in the self-guided tour of Dr. Hall’s influence on this town’s history is stated as saying:

15 Dr. Mathew Hall House,1846|Dr. Hall was a noted civic leader and community physician. In 1856, he moved his family to the country to escape “the evil influence of a river town.”– MDNR       To see more of this guide, click here. 

It must have been a rough place to reside at some point. Hard to imagine now.                              

For me, this town represents much of a ‘frontier-era Missouri’. It sits along the path taken by Lewis and Clark on their famous Expedition.

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I’ve been posting on this town several Thursdays now and I think it’s time to let it go with a slide show of extras. If you happen to be driving down I-70 in central Missouri though, I highly recommend taking the exit to Arrow Rock to see this River Town time capsule. It’s not a tourist trap and comes with a very scenic drive along the way. A real gem!

 

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Property-No Acreage/Thursday Doors

Thursday Doors in the words of Norm 2.0, ” is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favorite door photos from around the world. Feel free to join in on the fun by creating your own Thursday Doors post each week and then sharing it, between Thursday morning and Saturday noon (North American eastern time), by using the blue link-up button….”

The jaunt through Arrow Rock, Missouri continues for yet one more week. No promises to be finished with it, although I reserve the right to take a break from it. Time will tell.

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In case you were in the market for some business real estate in the area, here’s one right on the boardwalk of Down Town Arrow Rock. Antique/novelty shop, bakery, hair salon or photo/art studio would be my own personal suggestion. Hint, hint. 😉

Across the street is this pretty significant place in history in the state of Missouri…..

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I think the best approach to convincing you of the appeal of this Mid-Missouri real estate is with a little slide show. So hope you enjoy this slice of Huston Mercantile.

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Burglars/ThursdayDoors

“Burglars know there’s more than one way to skin a vault.” James Chiles, American Writer

(not the Missouri Confederate Outlaw, just to clarify)

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A collage of the Arrow Rock, Missouri, Friends of Arrow Rock Office ‘vault’. This building houses a display of many early Missouri firearms as well as other objects of interest of the era. This is along a row of storefront buildings with an 1800-style boardwalk. Original buildings were destroyed by fire in 1872 and 1901. We noticed but didn’t partake in the refreshments in the alcove.

For other wonderful Thursday Door posts, click here to stop by Norm 2.0 and find the blue frog button. 

 

 

Don’t Make Trouble/Thursday Doors

Mother’s have always been known for trying to steer their children in the right direction. I have a door this week that shows the worst result from a life of trouble.

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I first caught a glimpse of it here as I was capturing “Academy Boarding House” at Arrow Rock, Missouri.

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It’s really not too far from the boarding house. Just down the hill a bit.

I am glad my husband was willing to shut the door for me. I was kind of reluctant. Things break when I touch them. You can see we were treated with 2 doors. But I’m pretty sure both were air-conditioned. Well-ventilated is a more sophisticated way of expressing that I suppose.

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The modern roof is being held down with stablilizers. I imagine a good wind would topple the structure pretty easily otherwise. It’s surprising it is still standing to be perfectly honest.

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Here’s an inside view. Not sure where the lighting came from? There weren’t any windows. Only that little hole at the top. Spooky!

Calaboose is the title they give for this building and it means Big Cage. I find it rather amusing that the prisoner had enough street smarts to know he’d be upsetting all the students in the nearby boarding house. I can imagine they were kept awake til the wee hours of the morning with all that racket.

Thursday Doors, implemented by Norm 2.0 is a place to see doors from all over the world by simply finding the blue frog in his latest post on the subject here and clicking. You’ll see a list of entrants for this week and I encourage you to visit them for a wide variety of beauty we find simply in ‘doors’. They’re pretty awesome people too!

Persimmon Report/ Thursday Doors

I have to give kudos to Google for ‘trying’ to make this into a panoramic photo. So we’re going to ignore the fact that this roof line is a little, shall we say misshapen. But it does give me a jump off point for this week’s Thursday Doors post.

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Back Doors

I present the Academy Boarding House, circa 1829, at Arrow Rock, Missouri.

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Arrow Rock, Missouri is a National Historic Landmark. It is a village along the Missouri River that has been restored and is now preserved in its 1829 version for tourists to see a typical river town of the time. My first visit there was on a 7th grade field trip. (Thanks Miss Carter)

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Since public education didn’t exist until after the Civil War, the students of ‘The Academy’ (no longer standing) boarded here for $2.50 a week back in the year 1843. This is a log house underneath that white clapboard siding.

 

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Peering inside one of the front windows, I was able to capture one of the back doors. And outside that door is a persimmon tree that I’ve used to find the ‘winter prediction’ a few times. Inside each seed you’ll find one of three: Knife, Spoon, or Fork.

  • Knife = biting cold
  • Spoon= lots of snow shoveling
  • Fork = mild winter

Do you want to know what the verdict is for this year??

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I’ll let you know after I reminisce about watching my little girls roll down this hill. They probably wouldn’t want to try that now that they’re in their 20’s. You can tell we’ve visited here often. Great place to take a stroll in the Fall!

And the verdict is in……………… The 2017 Persimmon Report shows

 

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1 Spoon and 1 Knife. The 3rd seed was undetermined as it fell apart upon slicing. Be ready for a snowy, sharply cold winter according to Native American legend.

For other wonderful Thursday Door posts, click here to stop by Norm 2.0 and find the blue frog button. 

It’s Yarn O’clock Somewhere/Thursday Doors

 On my outings, if a yarn shop is detected, we must stop. Such is the case when the sign below was in my sights at Arrow Rock, Missouri last Saturday afternoon.

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Not the best angle for a door pic. Please forgive this photographer-in- training.

We were across the street when I spied this sign. After taking some pics of some doors around this historic site (future doors stash for later), I dragged the hubby with me to give in to the call of the wool. Once inside, I asked the salesperson permission to take some shots of this charming little niche.

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Behold the masses of yarn. Not the Walmart or other-mart type. But true, hand-spun, hand-dyed yarn from artisans. Real. Good. Stuff.

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So with the required door pic taken, a few steps more took me to a little bin that had sets of yarn, which I bought one of. You could read about that here, but only if you’re so inclined. My focus this post is on the eye candy.

 

And a cabinet-to-die-for was sitting along this wall. I need one about half this size and have been carefully watching local auctions for just the right one to fit in my chosen spot at home. Doors attached would be a must. I would need a few items hidden away. Can’t have the hubby seeing All my yarn purchases 😉

To see other wonderful door posts from around the globe, I welcome you to visit Here and search for the blue frog button. Click it and find all the links to fellow door lovers.