It’s Yarn O’clock Somewhere/Thursday Doors

 On my outings, if a yarn shop is detected, we must stop. Such is the case when the sign below was in my sights at Arrow Rock, Missouri last Saturday afternoon.

Yarn frontage

Not the best angle for a door pic. Please forgive this photographer-in- training.

We were across the street when I spied this sign. After taking some pics of some doors around this historic site (future doors stash for later), I dragged the hubby with me to give in to the call of the wool. Once inside, I asked the salesperson permission to take some shots of this charming little niche.

A good yarn

Behold the masses of yarn. Not the Walmart or other-mart type. But true, hand-spun, hand-dyed yarn from artisans. Real. Good. Stuff.

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So with the required door pic taken, a few steps more took me to a little bin that had sets of yarn, which I bought one of. You could read about that here, but only if you’re so inclined. My focus this post is on the eye candy.

 

And a cabinet-to-die-for was sitting along this wall. I need one about half this size and have been carefully watching local auctions for just the right one to fit in my chosen spot at home. Doors attached would be a must. I would need a few items hidden away. Can’t have the hubby seeing All my yarn purchases 😉

To see other wonderful door posts from around the globe, I welcome you to visit Here and search for the blue frog button. Click it and find all the links to fellow door lovers.

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World’s First in Glasgow/WPC

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A rural Missouri town has the distinction of having a ‘World’s First’. I present the site of the first railroad all steel bridge that crosses the Missouri River into this town of 1,103 residents according to the 2010 census.

Glasgow bridge

In 1880, the population was 1,841 and a port for riveroat departure/arrival. I’m sure the first sight of that new structure gave plenty of excitement to those residents during the 1878 completion. This current one is the replacement. Maybe someday I’ll happen upon a picture of the original?

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Til then here’s the view of the modern version built in 1960 as it stretches across the Mighty Mo.

For other Weekly Photo Challenge entries, click here.

How’d It Go?/ Sunday Sampler

Sunday Sampler

The season to begin Christmas shopping officially opened yesterday here in Central Missouri at the Windsor Septemberfest 2017. We were stationed at the Windsor Elementary School gymnasium in Windsor, Missouri, respectfully, along with many other crafters from around the region. Mother, my husband, and I were set up by the 8:45 am deadline.

Special thanks to our family and friends that showed up to help out, purchase or even just say hello! We loved seeing you!

Windsor September 17

Mother’s jams, jellies and salsas are a main attraction each time we attend an event. 

Kerchiefs are a great seller on Etsy and they get lots of Ooh’s and Aah’s during the day.

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Going to be in the Etsy shop by end of today.

And then I have a little collage of the ‘Sold’ items.

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A common denominator to purchases at these venues seems to be the desire to find that One of a Kind item. Even the LuLaRoe seller behind our booth tended to know this little tid bit. Nothing seemed to have a duplicate.

So, Sellers of the Land, let it be known that mass produced items are not in huge demand to small-town USA (exceptions: candles and other great scented items). I hope this trend continues because buying handmade truly supports small businesses.

Mother-lode/#Thursday Doors

Thursday Doors

I’ve talked about our Missouri State Fair a few  lots of times. I hope my readers will endure one more post. You see, I found the ‘mother-lode’ this year. I don’t recall ever seeing so many quilts in one building with doors on them as I did this year. And I’ve seen a lot of fairs come and go. After all, it’s only across the highway from our home. It’s The place of the year to see or be seen in Sedalia, Missouri. One of these days, I may enter my own quilt. But for now, I’m sharing this door extravaganza in quilts. Hope you enjoy!

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This next one, however, deserves extra inspection. I haven’t counted the doors, but someone has an enormous amount of patience to piece this work of art. I salute you as, apparently, do the judges this year. You were rewarded that purple ribbon. Much congratulations sent your way!

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The Motherlode for sure!

For other great Thursday Door posts, click the blue button at the bottom of Norm 2.0’s post here. It’s a wonderful way to see doors from all over the world.

Corner To Corner/WPC

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From the 2017 Missouri State Fair quilt exhibit.

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Because of the lighting (or lack thereof) and shadows this isn’t the best shot. It is, however, a huge inspiration to us quilters who try to use up all our fabric stash in one fell swoop. The Corner to Corner division in this quilt is what makes it different and loveable. The hand quilting is what got it a ribbon. Personally I think the creator deserved a blue one.

For other entries in the WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge, Click here.

In-Doors/ Thursday Doors

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These doors are serving as a frame for my weekly entry into the Thursday Doors realm. I could have edited a little more but decided to stick with a realistic lighting.

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This museum is the Missouri History Museum and this is the front view of the statue. Thomas Jefferson was such a remarkable president. They just don’t make ’em like that anymore. Personal note: I was so excited to tour his Monticello home back when my daughters were small that I shut my finger in the car door. It was quite a memory-maker moment to say the least. (I need to see if my old snapshots offer door possibilities).

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Thought you’d like to see what the little green box says.

Thursday Doors finds its beginnings over at Norm 2.0. Please visit and find more door posts there by clicking the blue frog at the bottom of his post. You won’t be disappointed.

 

Rural Chariton County/Thursday Doors

Thursday Doors

This week for my Thursday Doors post, I have a piece of yesteryear in CharitonCounty Missouri to share.

Tucked at the junction of Highways 5 and WW, there stands this abandoned building that I believe was once a school house. But I can’t quite be sure. There is not a signpost or placard visible and I didn’t want to trespass. Not that I’m afraid of being confronted….

more that I’m not a huge fan of ticks.

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The schoolhouse theory could be wrong as I’m not sure there’d be attic windows like these used during this era. So for me, it’s a mystery.

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I’d like to state that I think this would make a pretty fine farmhouse too just for the record. And yes, that is a tv antenna on the roof.

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I love old maps!

Historically, Chariton County was originally part of Howard County (outlined in bold above). In 1816, its current name and boundaries were given.Icouldn’t find any information on the building above, but I found a little excerpt from a Dept. of Natural Resources document describing the desirability of the area during this time frame.

In one 1819 account from Old Chariton David Manchester wrote to his sister in New York about the new land and how several young bachelors had fared during the 1818-19 winter. Manchester related the federal government land price of $1.50 per acre, but he said that most nearby land sold from $2-6, and the majority aroundChariton was $4 and up. complained of Looking into the future young Manchester the damned contracted New England men are our greatest opponents. They are jealous of us and envy us because they think that we will be admitted into the union on equal footing with the other states and become a large and powerful state. Poor insignificant Devils, who care for you? We will have our right in spite of you. But now [they] want to make slaves of us, no the people of Louisiana never will submit. • The boys are employed in building some houses in Chariton for themselves. . Our employment last winter was carrying on the distillery business. (David Manchester letter, 19 April 1819 #2064 Joint Collection, UMC) This one anecdote accurately described the relatively high value of Chariton district land and the desire of immigrants to make a new home in the Far West.

I wonder if Manchester was also on the search for a beau for his sister??  And a future lil’ homestead in Missouri?

For other Thursday Doors entries, I hope you’ll check the Blue Frog link at the bottom of Norm’s blog.

 

My Folly/Thursday Doors

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 This week for my Thursday Doors, you’ll see the interior view of The Folly Theatre in downtown Kansas City, Missouri. The handsome man you see here took me for a special evening out to celebrate our 30th anniversary. Weekend10a

I’m particularly fond of the earliest part of the evening as it was before ‘The Drink’.

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We had exclusive box seats. The one I circled is directly opposite ours. So Stage view was amazing!

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I do remember most everything. Especially meeting Brother Marty Stuart and the Fabulous Superlatives after the show. But to the person who slipped that something extra in my drink, just know that this ol’ girl didn’t fall off a turnip truck. I ended up with a nice policeman escorting me to the door with sincere interest in how I ended up in that condition. Your day will come.

For other Thursday Door entries, click here and find Norm’s blue link button at the bottom of his post.

Missouri Star/#AtoZChallenge

During the month of April, I’m participating in the Blogging From A to Z Challenge for my 4th year in a row – 3 of which are on this blog. Each day, except Sundays, there will be a post for the letter of the day as well as keeping with my personal theme of Quilts and Quotes. Feel free to leave a comment! I’d love to hear from you! Also check out the other A to Z’ers in the comment section of the Official A to Z Blog Page.

The Missouri Star block is another Civil War era block. A story of Mattie Lykins Bingham is a popular one associated with Missouri during that time in history. She was a Southern sympathizer married to a Unionist who happened to be a Kansas City banker as well. The story goes that she was suspected of spying for the Confederates and in particular blamed for what led to the Quantrell raid of Lawrence, Kansas. Quantrell and his men claim to have burned the town of Lawrence in an act of retalliation.

Historically the block name was given by the Nancy Cabot column in the 1933 Chicago Tribune.MOStarcollage

This one required a bit of pinning to match up the lines. If you ever attempt sewing/quilting, don’t sew over your pins. (My tip of the day.)

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I present a quote from a Missourian from the opposite side of our state:

“I love to see a young girl go out and grab the world by the lapels. Life’s a bitch. You’ve got to go out and kick ass.” Maya Angelou

I can hear her voice when I read that 🙂

Join me again tomorrow for more of the April A to Z Blog Challenge 2017!

Jefferson City/#AtoZChallenge

During the month of April, I’m participating in the Blogging From A to Z Challenge for my 4th year in a row – 3 of which are on this blog. Each day, except Sundays, there will be a post for the letter of the day as well as keeping with my personal theme of Quilts and Quotes. Feel free to leave a comment! I’d love to hear from you! Also check out the other A to Z’ers in the comment section of the Official A to Z Blog Page.

Jefferson City is the name of today’s 6-inch block. It’s also name to my home state’s (Missouri) capital. Apparently there are a couple other Jefferson City’s in both Montana and Tennessee. First I’d heard this until I started writing about ours. Here’s a pic taken by myself of our capital building.MissouriStateCapital

Sitting on the bluff of the Missouri River, its open for tours daily except for major holidays. There is a museum and many Thomas Hart Benton paintings throughout. I always enjoy a visit there seeing exhibits and reading about our state’s rich history. And this time of year the flowers are in full bloom. The magnolia trees are my favorite.

JeffersonCityCollage

The author of the book I’m taking my blocks from is not shown to be from Missouri or lived here as far as I could find out. I wonder why she chose this Civil War Era block? I am glad she did because I loved that I could use all three fabrics in it.

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Famous Missourian Quote

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Join me again tomorrow for more of the April A to Z Blog Challenge 2017!