Searching for Red/ Thursday Doors

Digging through the archives this week led me to some Red that will, once again, cover the Red prompt for today on Instagram and the Thursday Doors. Some unplanned time off led me down this road and I hope to be back on my photo-taking binges very soon.

To see other Thursday Doors entries, stop by Norm 2.0 and scroll down to the blue frog and click. You’ll see wonderful door posts from around the world.

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The red is pretty washed out here, but it’s hanging in there. No snow currently in Missouri at this time. But I do remember trick-or-treating in snow!

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Slightly more red and all doors seem to be present and accounted for.

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Devoid of doors as far as I can tell. But the red is definitely showing best in my 3rd choice.

A little blast from the past since we’re on the topic of farms from “The History of Pettis County, Missouri 1882”

The first crops were principally corn. Oats, wheat, hemp, flax and rye were raised. The tame grasses were not cultivated. The wild grass was considered good for all stock and hundreds of tons of prairie hay were annually mown by hand and stacked for the winter feed. At an early day spring and fall wheat were both tried. The smut and the accumulation of chintz bugs on spring wheat early convinced the farmers of this section that it was an unprofitable crop. Fall wheat, although not extensively raised, has generally done well. With the early farmers, corn was the staple product, and became the staff of life for man and beast, and the failure of the corn crop brought almost a famine. On corn, the hardy settlers depended for Johnny cake, hominy, hasty pudding, and succotash. Corn was the principal feed for horses, swine, cattle, and sheep. In the early autumn, just as soon as the ears had sufficiently ripened, the farmer with his wife and family entered the corn field, and stripped the blades from the ear down, after which they were cured, bound into bundles, and stacked as provender for winter use. The tops of the stalks were cut above the ear, bound into bundles and shocked for the cattle.

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Our Village Green/#AtoZChallenge

During the month of April, I’m participating in the Blogging From A to Z Challenge for my 4th year in a row – 3 of which are on this blog. Each day, except Sundays, there will be a post for the letter of the day as well as keeping with my personal theme of Quilts and Quotes. Feel free to leave a comment! I’d love to hear from you! Also check out the other A to Z’ers in the comment section of the Official A to Z Blog Page.

Being proud of your community is what this quilt block brings to mind for me. I grew up in rural Pettis County, Missouri and the gatherings took place at one of 2 spots. The Manila School or Antioch Baptist Church were those places.

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Manila School now stands abandoned where a bridal shower was held for me 30 years ago this month. Antioch Baptist Church is still alive and well. There, I attended Sunday School and Worship Services.  The grounds of both are lovingly attended to thankfully.

Until this blog post, it never occurred to me to take a photo of these two places from my childhood. I even had to ask my mother if we have any photos of them. Her answer was “probably somewhere”, but I’m not so sure. I think I would have remembered them. I was the camera hound at an early age. I have photo albums of my own and in none of them are these places. I believe I must have been too busy socializing to think ahead 45 years. So I have to appreciate even more the way this challenge has shown me those memories I need to hold dear.

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For the record, I need much more practice at completing one of these blocks. It was not user-friendly and I am not sure I am up to another attempt. What you see is what you get. As long as it holds together, we’re using it.

“Knowledge is power, Community is strength and Positive attitude is everything.”     Lance Armstrong

Join me again tomorrow for more of the April A to Z Blog Challenge 2017!

Blink-and-it’s-gone/Thursday Doors

Rural Missouri is defintely close to my heart and makes me homesick every single time I stop and reflect in places like this.

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Just a rural ‘blocked’ door photo from Bahner, Missouri. The old Dodge “Door” is in full view though.

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Missouri has many of these “Blink-and-it’s-gone” communities. Pettis County, my residence, is no exception. I grew up less than a mile from one. (future doorscursion) They remain for the most part unchanged except for the weathering of the wood and metal adornments.

From Wikipedia:

“Bahner is an unincorporated community in Pettis County, Missouri, United States. It is located at 38°34′10″N 93°7′43″W(38.5694640, -93.1285358), and its altitude is 886 feet (270 m).[2]

A post office called Bahner was established in 1882, and remained in operation until 1907.[3] Edward Bahner, an early postmaster, most likely gave the community his name.[4]

“Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favorite door photos from around the world.” For other Thursday Door entries, click here and find Norm’s blue link button at the bottom of his post.

The Bend/WordPress Photo Challenge

Curve

Flat Creek

Growing up in the country, you sit by a creek and always wonder what’s around that curve ahead; better known around here as “the bend”.

Hope all you dads out there find the perfect fishin’ hole this Father’s Day weekend.

For other great Photo Challenge entries, click here.

Turkey in the Straw/ WPC

State of Mind

So this week, share an image where you see a particularly strong connection between what we see and what you felt as you pressed that shutter button on your camera or phone.

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We’re takin a Sunday drive and it’s pretty brisk outside the truck. Saw plenty of photo opportunities if you wanted to freeze your tail end off. But I did not. Forgot my jacket. Lo and behold we see something stirring out the passenger window. The turkey are in the distance getting ready to go behind that stand of trees. The sun is in my eyes and I have no idea if this will even turn out a photo since I can’t even see the digital screen. But I do know this song was on my mind…..

As I was a-gwine down the road,
With a tired team and a heavy load,
I crack’d my whip and the leader sprung,
I says day-day to the wagon tongue.
Turkey in the straw, turkey in the hay,
Roll ’em up and twist ’em up a high tuckahaw
And twist ’em up a tune called Turkey in the Straw.

Have a wonderful weekend!